Phrases with "dear"

Jane Austen And, my dear Jane, I never saw you look in greater beauty. Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen [1813]

Arthur Conan Doyle Such are the adventures of last night, and you must acknowledge, my dear Holmes, that I have done you very well in the matter of a report. The Hound of the Baskervilles by Arthur Conan Doyle [1902]

Come when thou wilt, dear son. London Pride by Mary Elizabeth Braddon [1896]

Anthony Trollope Poor boy! Sweet dear boy! He, as he went away to his dinner, had his thoughts also about her. The Duke’s Children by Anthony Trollope

The firelight was warm on her cheek and hair, her needle once again completed the dear delusion: she sat there, his wife. The Imperialist by Sara Jeannette Duncan [1904]

Believe me, my dear friends, we are both of us grateful for all your kindness to us, past and present. “Jerry’s Gazette.” by Ellen Wood [1869]

What length of course do you propose, dear heart?” “I never run less than sixty miles,” Cael replied sullenly. Irish Fairy Tales by James Stephens

Charles Kingsley Only do ye mind this, dear soul alive, not to goo telling a crumb about mun, noo, not for the world, or yu’ll see naught at all, indeed, now. Westward Ho! by Charles Kingsley

George Gissing How do you like the scheme?” “But, my dear Noble,” said Arthur, turning his head, with a smile more resembling that of old than had yet risen to his face, “you forget that I am penniless. Workers in the Dawn by George Gissing [1880]

Anthony Trollope If we interfere, the chances are that my dear friends will make it up and turn upon us. North America by Anthony Trollope

E. F. Benson But as you must know so well, dear Olga, music makes an imperishable store of memories within one: morsels of Mozart: bits of Beethoven all audible to the inward ear. Trouble for Lucia by E. F. Benson [1939]

Anthony Trollope My dear old friend Laurence Fitzgibbon, in the performance of his official duties had to give an opinion on a matter affecting an expenditure of some thirty or forty thousand pounds of public money. Phineas Redux by Anthony Trollope

Benjamin Disraeli I was prepared for infidelity in London, but I confess, my dear Ferrars, you alarm me. Endymion by Benjamin Disraeli [1880]

John Bunyan Then said Evangelist farther, Art not thou the man that I found crying without the walls of the City of Destruction? Chr. Yes, dear Sir, I am the man. The Pilgrim's Progress by John Bunyan [1675]

At this point, my dear friend, I think it would not be amiss to place a line of asterisks, for the rest of the dialogue could hardly be translated except by onomatopœia. Mademoiselle de Maupin by Théophile Gautier [1835]

George Eliot For, dear Hetty, if I were to do what you one day spoke of, and make you my wife, I should do what you yourself would come to feel was for your misery instead of your welfare. Adam Bede by George Eliot [1859]

Charles Dickens They said he was wandering in his head yesterday, dear boy, and so they said the day before. The Old Curiosity Shop by Charles Dickens [1840]

George Gissing Be thankful for it, dear brother; so much the easier you combat with him whose ally is this body of death. Veranilda by George Gissing [1903]

Wilkie Collins What a house this would be — a broad hint, isn’t it, dear Lady Loring? — what a house for a wedding, with the drawing-room to assemble in and the picture gallery for the breakfast. The Black Robe by Wilkie Collins [1881]

The dear lord of the land was not the last; arrayed for the riding, with retainers full many, he ate a sop42 hastily after he had heard mass, and took his way quickly with his bugle to the field. Sir Gawain and the Green Knight by translated by Kenneth G. T. Webster and W. A. Neilson

When he did so he returned his warmest thanks to him as the preserver of three beings so dear to him that he declared he felt as if he could not have survived their loss. Ralph Rashleigh by James Tucker

Charles Dickens I showed it bad enough, no doubt; but what I thought, my little woman! —” “Oh, dear Dolf, don’t! Don’t!” cried his wife. The Haunted Man and the Ghost’s Bargain by Charles Dickens [1848]

Edith Wharton She was sure it was not what poor dear cousin Julia would have wished — she had told the executors so to their faces; but they were inaccessible to reason, and there was nothing to do but to wait. The House of Mirth by Edith Wharton [1905]

On earth you will not be happy, dear — nay, never. Signa by Ouida

Henry James This is not death, dear Ralph.” “Not for you — no. Portrait of a Lady by Henry James [1881]

She lay very quietly for a good while, and suddenly, with a beautiful look, and in a clear, glad voice, she said — ‘Mother!’ And old Sally said — ‘There’s no one, dear Miss Lily, but me. The House by the Church-Yard by J. Sheridan Le Fanu

Anthony Trollope But the one thing necessary to her daily life was the power of loving those who were dear to her. Framley Parsonage by Anthony Trollope

George Meredith Go, dear friend,” she sobbed; “you have given me tears, as I hoped. Vittoria by George Meredith [1867]

E. F. Benson But teach our dear friend what I have taught you. Queen Lucia by E. F. Benson [1920]

George Gissing What are you going to do when you get there?” “I told you, my dear Gammon, it shall be done this very night, whether I have news or not. The Town Traveller by George Gissing [1897]

In the terrible circumstances that have reunited us, my dear daughter, I can see the finger of Providence, and through them I have learned your worth. Captain Fracasse by Théophile Gautier [1863]

Henry James But, my dear friend, I was right, all the same. The American by Henry James [1877]

George Meredith Ah, my dear fellow, I ‘m not a parson. Diana of the Crossways by George Meredith [1885]

Tobias Smolle O, my dear Letty! what shall I say about poor Mr Wilson? I have promised to break off all correspondence, and, if possible, to forget him: but, alas! I begin to perceive that will not be in my power. The Expedition of Humphry Clinker by Tobias Smolle

Wilkie Collins God bless you and keep you, my dear — and your husband, and your children! Good-by!” He stooped and kissed her. No Name by Wilkie Collins [1862]

Anthony Trollope My dear Lord Hampstead, I hope I may be excused for addressing your lordship in this familiar manner. Marion Fay by Anthony Trollope [1882]

Rudyard Kipling Isn’t your Mother ready yet? MISS T. I should think so; but promise me, Captain Gadsby, you won’t take poor dear Mamma twice round Jakko any more. Soldiers Three by Rudyard Kipling [1899]

E. F. Benson No, dear Georgie, I would never desert my dear Riseholme. If it was a choice between London and Riseholme, I should not hesitate in my choice. Lucia in London by E. F. Benson [1927]

Jane Austen He can be of essential service to me; and if you would have the goodness, my dear Miss Elliot, to make it an object to yourself, of course it is done. Persuasion by Jane Austen [1818]

Anthony Trollope Of course his Clara was doubly dear to him, having been made his own after such difficulties as these. Marion Fay by Anthony Trollope [1882]

Ivan Turgenev I always felt drawn to you, my dear boy — on my honour I did. The Diary of a Superfluous Man and other stories by Ivan Turgenev

Henry James It was odd what a difference was made for me by the renewed sight of dear Guy. I didn’t of course analyse this sense at the time; that was still to come. The Sacred Fount by Henry James [1901]

Wilkie Collins Most gratifying, most astonishing — highly flattered I am sure; highly indeed, my dear Sir! Don’t suppose, for one moment, I ever doubted your honourable feeling. Basil by Wilkie Collins [1852]

George Meredith The beauty of the character of a dear innocent young girl, with every gratification at command, who could make the offer, strikes me as unparalleled. Diana of the Crossways by George Meredith [1885]

See now, how dear he bought man, that he made after his own image, and how dear he again-bought us, for the great love that he had to us, and we never deserved it to him. The Travels of Sir John Mandeville by John Mandeville

H. G. Wells You know I said, when you told me of these things dear God! but that was scarcely a score of hours ago! — I said that I had not your faith. When the Sleeper Wakes by H. G. Wells [1899]

Ann Radcliffe My dear girl, I will not disguise my feelings; they assure me I have not long to live. The Italian by Ann Radcliffe [1796]

Wilkie Collins You love her, don’t you? Is she engaged to be married? In that case — between ourselves, dear Miss Wyvil, a clergyman is obliged to be cautious — I may own that I love her too. I Say No by Wilkie Collins [1884]

Jack London I knew, as never before, nor since, the thousand dear and delightful anguishes of love frustrated but ever resilient and beckoned on by the very goddess of love. The Red One by Jack London [1918]

R. D. Blackmore Janetta, you have eaten up that bit of broiled hake that I was keeping for your dear mother!” “Now really, papa, you are too crafty. Mary Anerley by R. D. Blackmore [1880]

Benjamin Disraeli Believe me, dear Sir Carte, ‘Your faithful servant, ‘St. James. ‘Carlstein bears this, which you will receive in an hour. The Young Duke by Benjamin Disraeli [1831]

Wilkie Collins Let me go to my dear little Emily — and try to forget what I have heard. I Say No by Wilkie Collins [1884]

Jules Verne The vicar will take my place, and I will put myself at your disposal against your dear son’s arrival. A Winter Amid the Ice by Jules Verne [1874]

Anthony Trollope He is always fond of the young officers, and is not the less inclined to be so of one who is so dear and near to you. An Eye for an Eye by Anthony Trollope [1879]

Thomas Hardy For how can we live, and relinquish our high aim, and bring down our dear sister Rosa to the level of a gipsy’s step-daughter?’ There was excitement in the parish of Narrobourne one day. Life’s Little Ironies by Thomas Hardy

Ford Madox Ford Her dear love! And as soon as he was well to bring her ladyship down. Last Post by Ford Madox Ford [1928]

Well, dear dame, all in good time. Paul Clifford by Edward Bulwer-Lytton [1830]

William Makepeace Thackeray So each shall mourn in life’s advance, Dear hopes, dear friends, untimely killed; Shall grieve for many a forfeit chance, A longing passion unfulfilled. Dr. Birch and his young friends by William Makepeace Thackeray [1849]

Andrew Lang Then he awoke and cried out: “Oh! how I shudder, how I shudder, dear wife! Yes, now I know what shuddering is. The Blue Fairy Book by Andrew Lang

O light-handed dear delight, Certes thou must say aright. The Story of Grettir the Strong by translated by William Morris and Eiríkr Magnússon [1869]

I looked round, identifying a face here or there, and stepping back trod on some one’s toe, and turned to find it belonged to the Right Hon. G. B. Mottisham, dear to the PUNCH caricaturists. The New Machiavelli by Herbert George Wells [1911]

Good-day! Good-day, dear Leonard.” Bowing low, he left the room. Marvels and Mysteries by Richard Marsh

Wilkie Collins An unaccustomed tenderness trembled in her dark eyes and softened her firm lips, as she glanced aside at the empty chair in which the dear companion of all our joys and sorrows had been sitting. The Woman in White by Wilkie Collins [1860]

Radclyffe Hall They nodded their heads, chewing the ends of their cigars and murmured ‘By Gad!’ and ‘My dear fellow!’ the while they exaggerated and romanced about the past. The Unlit Lamp by Radclyffe Hall

Arnold Bennett I long to see you, my dear sister. The Old Wives’ Tale by Arnold Bennett [1908]

E. Phillips Oppenheim There is a dear little girl in our company—Fluffy Dean we all call her—only eighteen years old. Peter Ruff and the Double Four by E. Phillips Oppenheim [1912]

Henry James My dear sister, I bless your union. The American by Henry James [1877]

Wilkie Collins Oh, my love! my love! my heart may speak to you NOW! I It is yesterday again since we parted — yesterday, since your dear hand lay in mine — yesterday, since my eyes looked their last on you. The Woman in White by Wilkie Collins [1860]

Will you and dear Lucy join me there? I ask it of your friendship, and I am quite sure that neither of you will shrink aghast at the proposal of solacing your invalid relation. Paul Clifford by Edward Bulwer-Lytton [1830]

Bram Stoker It was to me a painful meeting, for it brought back all poor dear Lucy’s hopes of only a few months ago. Dracula by Bram Stoker [1897]

O Lord Jesus Christ, save ‘er! “Oh, Perce, dear . Limehouse Nights by Thomas Burke

Anthony Trollope My dear fellow, I can’t write this letter for you. Ayala’s Angel by Anthony Trollope

George Elio My dear boy,’ he continued in a kinder tone, ‘the heaviest burthen has fallen on you. Mr. Gilfil’s Love Story by George Elio

To say truth, my dear Dick, I wish to see a little of your part of the world, and, I will confess it, en passant, to see a little of you too. The Evil Guest by J. Sheridan Le Fanu

Stay, my dear lady, don’t be put out. Lady Jenkins by Ellen Wood [1879]

So get your paper and pen, dear child, and write her one of your prettiest letters. Initials Only by Anna Katharine Green

Walter Scott So you see how we manage matters in India, my dear friend. Saint Ronan’s Well by Walter Scott [1824]

You see, hitherto, I make no complaints, dear sister; and if I continue to like travelling as I do at present, I shall not repent my project. Letters from Turkey by Mary Wortley Montagu [1725]

Olaf Stapledon Those dear delights, those modest powers, all that is the cherished me, I willingly let go. Death into Life by Olaf Stapledon

M. P. Shiel Pray write as to the scripturalness of Diseased Persons. Farewell, dear friend. The Last Miracle by M. P. Shiel [1906]

Suddenly Varick’s tones floated again towards the listener: “I’ll take your word for it, my dear girl. From Out the Vasty Deep by Marie Belloc Lowndes [1920]

Rudyard Kipling Our dear Eddi ambled up, still beating time to his imaginary choir. Rewards and Fairies by Rudyard Kipling [1910]

If this young man — the owner of Latchetts — dear me! Perhaps he should not have been so —— “I hope you don’t think ——” he began. Brat Farrar by Josephine Tey

He held it high as he had seen them do on the stage of the Theatre Royal. “Sweet souvenir!” he cried, and kissed it, “most dear remembrance!” The Deacon fed on the sight. The House with the Green Shutters by George Douglas Brown [1901]

I BELIEVE, dear sister, you will easily forgive my not writing to you from Dresden, as I promised, when I tell you, that I never went out of my chaise from Prague to this place. Letters from Turkey by Mary Wortley Montagu [1725]

M. P. Shiel The little maid’s eyes rested upon him, and she thought to herself, “Is not this a dear boy?” “But how are we to amuse him?” she asked. The Lost Viol by M. P. Shiel [1905]

H. Rider Haggard It was indirectly through me that the dear little girl was in her present position. Allan Quatermain by H. Rider Haggard

I love you FOR YOURSELF, and I love in you the dear child whose welfare I tenderly watched. Queen Victoria by Lytton Strachey

Anthony Trollope I shall always look back upon the dear old Moonbeam, and the B. B., and Hossy’s wonderful port wine with regret. Ralph the Heir by Anthony Trollope [1871]

H. G. Wells My dear Father, I had intended to come along this week but more delays have arisen and so I suppose I had better fill up the gap with a letter. An Experiment in Autobiography by H. G. Wells

Wilkie Collins And now, my dear Sir, the next point is: how about your own honoured family — eh?” “It is exactly there that the difficulty lies. Basil by Wilkie Collins [1852]

Wilkie Collins Your biliary secretions, dear friend, are all right, and you take bright views. The Dead Secret by Wilkie Collins [1857]

Well, I made a bid for a sense of shame And the memories dear of the good old game. The Man from Snowy River and other verses by A. B. Paterson

I see she is out of spirits; I wish I could help her, dear girl, but the worst of all would be to let her guess the real name and meaning of all this, so I can’t venture to say a word. The Heir of Redclyffe by Charlotte M. Yonge [1853]

Anthony Trollope We all see that, except our dear friend here, the milk of whose nature runs so softly that he would not have the heart to refuse the Pope the loan of his pulpit, if the Pope would come and ask it. Barchester Towers by Anthony Trollope

Oh, my dear readers, it only seems so. Miss Lonelyhearts by Nathanael West [1933]

George Gissing To tell you the whole truth, dear Miss Shepperson, I have no doubt that, if you like my idea, he would at once put aside that money to be ready for an emergency. A Charming Family by George Gissing

James Hogg Tell me this, has he overcome you, or has he not?” “He has not, my dear father,” said I. “in the strength of the Lord, I hope I have withstood him. The Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner by James Hogg [1824]

William Makepeace Thackeray Harassing public duties occupy so much myself and Lord Bobtail, that we have scarce time to see our private friends; among whom, I hope, my dear Lady Griffin will allow me to rank her. The Memoirs of Mr. Charles J. Yellowplush by William Makepeace Thackeray [1838]

You will come to me there, my dear one, and we shall live together for ever. Helen’s Curate by Ellen Wood [1877]

George Gissing I wish you, dear lord, a fair journey. Veranilda by George Gissing [1903]

She would arrange herself on the settee with the green dragons and instantly begin: ‘But, my dear Miss Berry, we must not be too nice. Judith Paris by Hugh Walpole [1931]

Wilkie Collins My only chance of knowing what had really happened to Uncle George, my only hope of seeing him again, rested with those two near and dear relatives. The Queen of Hearts by Wilkie Collins [1859]

And — But oh, this is kind! Margaret herself — my dear Margaret!” We had just turned away from the house, in our up-and-down walk; and Mrs. Poyntz stood immediately fronting us. A Strange Story by Edward Bulwer-Lytton [1862]

Walter Scott Do not, my dear son Edward, permit this bloody prejudice to master your mind. The Monastery by Walter Scott [1820]

Florence Dixie Ah ! if I ever doubted you for a moment you will forgive me, for your dear fair name shall be redeemed. Redeemed in Blood by Florence Dixie [1889]

Good-night, for I am afraid D’Albert may be looking for me; good-night, my dear friend. Mademoiselle de Maupin by Théophile Gautier [1835]

Anthony Trollope Do it at once, my dear friend; you know I would not trouble you, were I in a state to do it myself. Barchester Towers by Anthony Trollope

Wilkie Collins A pauper’s meal, my dear girl — seasoned with a gentleman’s welcome. No Name by Wilkie Collins [1862]

Ralph Waldo Emerson Then the solid material interest predominates, so dear to English understanding, wherein the association is logical, between merit and land. English Traits by Ralph Waldo Emerson [1856]

Gertrude Stein Does a prison make a window net does it show plates and little coats and a dear noise. Geography and Plays by Gertrude Stein

John Galsworthy My dear boy — it is not easy to write like this. To Let by John Galsworthy

George Meredith Press it, if necessary; otherwise she might be disappointed, my dear fellow. The Tragic Comedians by George Meredith [1880]

Anthony Trollope He did know — though now at this moment he was most loath to own to himself that it was so — that his dear wife had been the most imprudent of women. The Duke’s Children by Anthony Trollope

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle I don’t know what your poor dear mother would have thought of it. The Doings of Raffles Haw by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle [1891]

H. Rider Haggard My excuse for alluding to it must be that you are the child of my old friend — ah! we were great friends fifty years ago, my dear — and that I have myself a near interest in the matter. Dawn by H. Rider Haggard

Lucy Maud Montgomery Of course I promised Diana that no Queen’s girl, no matter how much I liked her, should ever be as dear to me as she is; but I’ve lots of second-best affections to bestow. Anne of Green Gables by Lucy Maud Montgomery [1908]

Robert Louis Stevenson Anyway I left, the only cabin passenger, four and a kid in the second cabin, and a dear voyage it had like to have proved. Vailima Letters by Robert Louis Stevenson

Tobias Smolle I demanded a parley: and having assured him of my pacific disposition, Gawky exclaimed, “Ah, villain! you have killed my dear wife. The Adventures of Roderick Random by Tobias Smolle

Sir Walter Scott You must be aware, my dear Edith, how often family connections and early predilections influence our actions more than abstract arguments. Old Mortality by Sir Walter Scott [1816]

Susanna Rowson At other times I see my father angry and frowning, point to horrid caves, where, on the cold damp ground, in the agonies of death, I see my dear mother and my revered grand-father. Charlotte Temple by Susanna Rowson [1791]

The dear young thing must not walk too long with her swain. Mohawks by Mary Elizabeth Braddon [1886]

H. G. Wells What was going to happen to these hesitating associates when they heard of this quarrel with America? “My dear sir,” he said. The Autocracy of Mr. Parham by H. G. Wells [1930]

Reserved people pay dear for their reserve when they are in trouble, when the iron enters into their soul, and their eyes meet the eyes of the world tearless, unflinching, making no sign. Sir Charles Danvers by Mary Cholmondeley [1889]

Now advise, dear friends, in what manner she shall ride thither. The Nibelungenlied by translated by Daniel B. Shumway

George Gissing But I shall endeavour to think of you as a dear friend, as the brother you might perhaps have been to me if Fate had permitted it. Workers in the Dawn by George Gissing [1880]

G. K. Chesterton How dear and distant it all seems! I have lived to see biological controversies, in which it is much truer to say that the official Darwinians are in hiding. Autobiography by G. K. Chesterton [1936]

No, my dear Laura, you may feel quite comfortable in coming to the Vicarage. Your husband’s secret is only known to Edward and me. The Cloven Foot by Mary Elizabeth Braddon [1879]

Anthony Trollope Dear, dear Clary,—you know I love you. Ralph the Heir by Anthony Trollope [1871]

George Gissing Pull yourself together, dear boy. The Odd Women by George Gissing [1892]

Not that she was at all surprised; dear brave gentlemen who could look for burglars on their bicycles at dead of night, it was only what you might expect of them, bless their lion hearts. The Black Mask by E. W. Hornung [1901]

G. K. Chesterton Then I added aloud, in what was meant to be a cheery and sensible voice, but which sounded in my ears almost as strange as the wind: “Come, come, Basil, my dear fellow. The Club of Queer Trades by G. K. Chesterton [1905]

D. H. Lawrence She was like a dear, dear sister to him. The Ladybird by D. H. Lawrence

Wilkie Collins I feel as if I had parted from my former self — as if the hopes once so dear to me had all gone back to some past time from which I am now far removed. No Name by Wilkie Collins [1862]

Oscar Wilde Find expression for a sorrow, and it will become dear to you. Intentions by Oscar Wilde [1891]

Elizabeth Gaskell After what has happened, one trembles at any appearance of sickness; and when anything ails Papa, I feel too keenly that he is the LAST— the only near and dear relative I have in the world. The Life of Charlotte Bronte by Elizabeth Gaskell [1857]

Charles Dickens And I think the traveller must be yourself, dear Grandfather, because this what you do to us, and what we do to you. The Child’s Story by Charles Dickens [1852]

Anthony Trollope My dear mother is not at all like your ladies. The Duke’s Children by Anthony Trollope

Good-bye, dear Janet. I pray that you may find it in your heart to forgive me for having brought this trouble upon you. The Beautiful White Devil by Guy Boothby [1897]

However, my dear Dericka, there is nothing to be said. The Crowned Skull by Fergus Hume

Well, then, dear madam, you will not be far wrong. Hard Cash by Charles Reade [1863]

So we sat down to wait, and talked meantime of dear old Winston every day. The Black Mate by Joseph Conrad [1908]

Thomas Hardy You shall have somebody to walk with you who looks more of a dandy than I— please God you shall!” “But, my dear father,” she said, much distressed, “I don’t mind at all. The Woodlanders by Thomas Hardy

The Caliph, unable any longer to refrain, exclaimed — “For the love of Mahomet, my dear Fakreddin, have done! let us proceed to your valley, and enjoy the fruits that Heaven hath vouchsafed you. The History of the Caliph Vathek by William Beckford

Arthur Conan Doyle Thank you, my dear — now as ever you are the queen of managers. The Poison Belt by Arthur Conan Doyle [1913]

Henry Handel Richardson Then dear old Tilly had travelled down from Ballarat to see her; Jerry come all the way from Wangaratta. Not to speak of many a kindness shewn her by less intimate acquaintances. Ultima Thule by Henry Handel Richardson

Anthony Trollope He felt that Sir Thomas had been reasonable — and he felt also that Gertrude Tringle would perhaps have been dear at the money. Ayala’s Angel by Anthony Trollope

How many times have you experienced it since?” “You can only be in love once, my dear lady, and that’s just the trouble of it. In Normandy by Ella D'Arcy [1904]

Lady Flora would not have believed an angel, had an angel come and told her, that her dear little friend Ivy Lexton had fainted, not from relief, but from sheer, agonising fear. The Story of Ivy by Marie Belloc Lowndes [1927]

Wilkie Collins My dear father--though I was far from deserving his kindness--entered into the matter heart and soul. A Fatal Fortune by Wilkie Collins [1874]

Thomas Hardy During the evening he said to her casually: ‘Is your step-father a cousin of your mother, dear Frances?’ ‘Oh, no,’ said she. Life’s Little Ironies by Thomas Hardy

He had been en pension instead with a dear old professor of chemistry and his family at Puteaux, and used to go in and out. An impossible ideal by Sara Jeannette Duncan [1903]

I remember her mouth and ——” “My dear young lady,” laughed the professor, “she died before you were born. The Grave-digger of Monks Arden by Arthur Gask [1938]

William Makepeace Thackeray Have you been bidgeon-shooting, my dear Squire? De fon is gabidal. Cox’s Diary by William Makepeace Thackeray [1855]

He lifted his hat and answered with the politeness dear to French officials. In the Quarter by Robert W. Chambers

Charles Dickens I only want a little help once more, a few pounds, but two score pounds, dear Quilp.’ ‘The last advance was seventy,’ said the dwarf; ‘and it went in one night. The Old Curiosity Shop by Charles Dickens [1840]

The peer was a dear old gentleman, but it was me he wanted, and not any secretary at all. The Master Spy by Arthur Gask [1936]

Wilkie Collins The dear old man controlled his anxieties on my account, and spared me the questions which his fatherly interest in my welfare made him eager to ask. The Law and the Lady by Wilkie Collins [1875]

His affection had been very sweet and dear — a pleasure new and incomparable: now that this seemed withdrawn, I cared not for his lessons. Villette by Charlotte Brontë [1853]

Jules Verne The “strange” shadow so dear to Victor Hugo’s pen bound them on all sides. Round the Moon by Jules Verne [1873]

E. F. Benson And we meet for lunch at dear Mr. Wyse’s the next day? Yes? He will get tired of poor little me if he sees me two days running, so I shall not ask him. Miss Mapp by E. F. Benson [1922]

H. Rider Haggard He remembered that he held Whitefire dear above all things, and that Eric’s eye had no worth to him, except that the loss of it would spoil his beauty, so that perhaps Gudruda would turn from him. Eric Brighteyes by H. Rider Haggard

Wilkie Collins It is impossible for us to go to law, as you propose, on the subject of the Will. “Believe me, dear sir, yours gratefully, “MAGDALEN VANSTONE.” “Lincoln’s Inn. November 17th. No Name by Wilkie Collins [1862]

I never ——” “My dear fellow,” broke in Sir George vehemently, so vehemently that it might almost have been that he spoke in great relief. The House on the Fens by Arthur Gask [1940]

Bram Stoker The dear horses are patient and good, and they give us no trouble. Dracula by Bram Stoker [1897]

He told the schoolmaster that little George Talboys had been left in his charge by a dear friend, who had sailed for Australia some months before, and whom he believed to be dead. Lady Audley’s Secret by Mary Elizabeth Braddon [1862]

George Meredith When the ladies had run to the end of it, he asked them: ‘Well; now then?’ ‘But it’s capital—the dear laddies!’ Mrs. Lawrence exclaimed. Lord Ormont and his Aminta by George Meredith [1894]

Tobias Smolle Indeed, I have another more substantial cause of affliction — I have some religious scruples, my dear friend, which lie heavy on my conscience. The Expedition of Humphry Clinker by Tobias Smolle

Henry James My dear sister,” said the young man, “nous n’avons qu’a nous tenir; we shall be great swells!” Madame Munster looked at him, and her eye exhibited a slight responsive spark. The Europeans by Henry James [1878]

Anthony Trollope The light of the sun was very dear to her, but even that might be purchased at too dear a cost. Framley Parsonage by Anthony Trollope

And yet, you see, he came back to me,—I fought through,—and you, my dear one, will fight through, please God, to be as happy a woman as your mother has been ever since you have known her. Barbara Rebell by Marie Belloc Lowndes [1905]

Gaston Leroux The letter was not from Natacha. It was from Gounsovski. This is what it said: “My dear Monsieur Joseph Rouletabille, if it will not inconvenience you, I wish you would come and dine with me to-day. The Secret of the Night by Gaston Leroux [1913]

George Meredith But he was a cheerful martyr! ‘You dear Don Doloroso!’ she resumed. Evan Harrington by George Meredith [1861]

Anthony Trollope Abandon the idea, my dear Tudor — pray abandon it. The Three Clerks by Anthony Trollope

Anthony Trollope Our dear Wamba disturbs his mistress in some devotional conversation with her chaplain, and the stern lady orders that the fool shall have three-dozen lashes. Thackeray by Anthony Trollope [1879]

Anatole France Such is the way, my dear boy, that we colour for the use of our own eyes our worst instincts. At the Sign of the Reine Pédauque by Anatole France

Andrew Lang As soon as the duck perceived him, it cried in a human voice, ‘Oh, dear Prince Milan, for the love of Heaven give me back my garment, and I will be so grateful to you. The Green Fairy Book by Andrew Lang

Nathaniel Hawthorne Indistinctly as she discerned the snow-child, the mother thought to herself that never before was there a snow-figure so cunningly made, nor ever such a dear little girl and boy to make it. The Snow Image and other stories by Nathaniel Hawthorne [1851]

I have asked dear old Horton to be present; and he, Fräulein, and Maulevrier will complete the party. Phantom Fortune by Mary Elizabeth Braddon [1883]

George Eliot Nay, I had the struggling action of a myriad lives around me, each single life as dear to itself as mine to me. Impressions of Theophrastus Such by George Eliot [1878]

I must now leave you, my dear Richard,’ he said; ‘and I hope my words will have made an impression on you. Robbery Under Arms by Rolf Boldrewood

Sinclair Lewis He came from South Biddlesford, Connecticut, and his father, to whom he often referred as “that dear and so classical a bibliophile,” had been an excellent hat-manufacturer. Dodsworth by Sinclair Lewis

Henry James You see I treat you as an old friend, dear Mr. Littlemore. I’ll leave you with Sir Arthur. You’ll both excuse me. The Siege of London by Henry James [1883]

William Makepeace Thackeray However, keep the remainder, dear Sam, and buy yourself what you please with it. The History of Samuel Titmarsh and the Great Hoggarty Diamond by William Makepeace Thackeray

Bram Stoker The lady, sir, whom I am so happy as to love, and in whom my dreams of life-long happiness are centred, is Mimi Watford!” “Then, my dear Adam, I need not wait to offer congratulations. The Lair of the White Worm by Bram Stoker [1911]

Bram Stoker When it was over, Van Helsing stood up and said, “Now, my dear friends, we go forth to our terrible enterprise. Dracula by Bram Stoker [1897]

I was a Lutheran once at Bonn — dear Bonn! — charming Bonn! — where there were so many handsome students. Villette by Charlotte Brontë [1853]

Henry Fielding Go, my dear Jack, bring hither my little all which remains now: fly, child, if thou dost not intend likewise to forsake me in my afflictions. The History of the Life of the Late Mr. Jonathan Wild The Great by Henry Fielding

Arthur Conan Doyle The Aboriginal Evolution Society, my dear boy. The Firm of Girdlestone by Arthur Conan Doyle [1890]

E. F. Benson Oh dear me, the post goes in half an hour, and I have a whole budget to send. The Gardener by E. F. Benson

Yes, dear love, I will defy augury. Mohawks by Mary Elizabeth Braddon [1886]

Sir Walter Scott Do not think of MY friends, dear Fergus; let me rather have your influence where it may be more necessary to remove obstacles — I mean with your lovely sister. Waverley by Sir Walter Scott [1829]

Thomas Wolfe At that moment Ebury Street was very near, and it seemed very dear to him. You Can’t Go Home Again by Thomas Wolfe [1940]

Will you get Steadman to write to his lordship’s steward, and see what can be done? ‘I hope the dear hand is better. Phantom Fortune by Mary Elizabeth Braddon [1883]

Caroline Lamb But to you, while she smiles and plays around you, and fills the space which I so soon must leave—to you, she will prove a dear and constant interest. Glenarvon by Caroline Lamb [1816]

Anthony Trollope She would not have sat in that way, pressing back her hair from her brow, with all the appearance of widowhood banished from her face, in the presence of any but a dear and close friend. The Claverings by Anthony Trollope

Gaston Leroux You know, Feodor, that he smokes his pipe just like the dear little porcelain domovoi. The Secret of the Night by Gaston Leroux [1913]

His dear name was on it and his brave courageous acts. Hard Cash by Charles Reade [1863]

George Meredith Judge if they’re anxious, when it’s to stop them from seeing you, Philip!’ ‘Good-night, dear boy. Celt and Saxon by George Meredith [1910]

George Gissing But my sister — my dear sister —’ ‘I didn’t want to distress you. The Odd Women by George Gissing [1892]