Phrases with "massy"

To the rest of the community, all that took place within those massy walls was enveloped in mystery. A Thousand Miles up the Nile by Amelia B. Edwards [1877]

The buildings made of the porous tetzontli, though generally low, were so massy and extensive, and the canals were so numerous, that their progress was necessarily slow. The History of the Conquest of Mexico by William Hickling Prescott [1843]

Benjamin Disraeli The massy portal shook; a few blows of the battering ram, and it fell. The Rise of Iskander by Benjamin Disraeli [1834]

Benjamin Disraeli It was a forest of firs, but quite unlike such as might be met with in the north of Europe or of America. Every tree was perfect — huge and complete, and full of massy grace. Lothair by Benjamin Disraeli [1870]

Henry Handel Richardson On the trellis behind her a vine hung laden with massy bunches of muscatelles. Australia Felix by Henry Handel Richardson

Seen in certain lights, the Pyramids look like piles of massy gold. A Thousand Miles up the Nile by Amelia B. Edwards [1877]

Henry Handel Richardson Tight, high bodices of countless buttons went first, baring the massy arms and fat-creased necks of a plump maturity. Growing Pains by Henry Handel Richardson

Benjamin Disraeli The entrance to this temple is through a magnificent propylon;-that is, a portal flanked by massy pyramidal moles. Eastern Sketches by Benjamin Disraeli

Sir Richard Burton The wives of the emirs and wazirs and chamberlains and courtiers all stood in double line, each holding a massy cierge ready lighted. The Arabian Nights' Entertainments by Sir Richard Burton

The opening lines,— Lake Leman lies by Chillon’s walls; A thousand feet in depth below, Its massy waters meet and flow,— bring before us in a few words the conditions of a hopeless bondage. Byron by John Nichol [1880]

Ann Radcliffe He reached the arches, and discovered beyond a kind of inner hall, of considerable extent, which was closed at the farther end by a pair of massy folding-doors, heavily ornamented with carving. A Sicilian Romance by Ann Radcliffe [1790]

Benjamin Disraeli The main force of the Turkish garrison had been quartered in an old palace of the Archbishop, situate in the middle of the city on a slightly rising and open ground, a massy building of rustic stone. The Rise of Iskander by Benjamin Disraeli [1834]

Benjamin Disraeli His daughter, a soft and delicate girl, touches the light guitar: catching the notes of the music from the opened opera, which is placed before the father on a massy music-stand. Vivian Grey by Benjamin Disraeli [1827]

Benjamin Disraeli He found at the side of his bed a blunderbuss, a cutlass, and a pike; and he was directed to secure the door of his chamber with a great chain and a massy iron bar. The Voyage of Captain Popanilla by Benjamin Disraeli [1828]

Daniel Defoe It is a massy pile of building, consisting of high and thick walls of stone, raised at first with all the methods that skill and art could devise, but maintained now with very little difficulty. From London to Land’s End by Daniel Defoe

The massy portals of the churches swung creaking on their hinges; and some few lay dead on the pavement. The Last Man by Mary Shelley

William Cowper The lumber stood Ponderous, and fixed by its own massy weight. The Task by William Cowper [1785]

Benjamin Disraeli The building formed the farthest side of a quadrangle, which you entered through an ancient and massy gate; on each side of which was a small building, of course the lodges. Vivian Grey by Benjamin Disraeli [1827]

Herman Melville Of an ancient style, massy and rusty in link, shackle and bolt, they seemed even more fit for the ship’s present business than the one for which she had been built. Benito Cereno by Herman Melville

Benjamin Disraeli The entrance to this temple is through a magnificent propylon, that is, a portal flanked by massy pyramidal moles. Eastern Sketches by Benjamin Disraeli

William Cowper Three legs upholding firm A massy slab, in fashion square or round. The Task by William Cowper [1785]

Ann Radcliffe Some remains of massy walls, that still exhibited loops for archers, were all that now hinted of its former use. The Italian by Ann Radcliffe [1796]

It rose towering in a massy parallelogram, disclosed from top to bottom in the cloudless sky, far above all the others. A First Year in Canterbury Settlement by Samuel Butler

Sir Walter Scott I hae broken his head or now, for as massy as he’s riding ahint us. Old Mortality by Sir Walter Scott [1816]

The third, succeeding to the last reward, Two goodly bowls of massy silver shar’d, With figures prominent, and richly wrought, And two brass caldrons from Dodona brought. The Aeneid by translated by John Dryden

Walter Scott And here, beside the mountain flood, A massy castle frown'd; Since first the Pictish race in blood The haunted pile did found. The Minstrelsy of the Scottish Border by Walter Scott [1802-1803]

Benjamin Disraeli The eunuch tapped with his silver stick, at a small gate, which opened, and admitted them into a garden, full of large clumps of massy shrubs. The Rise of Iskander by Benjamin Disraeli [1834]

Dougal opened the main door with a massy key. Huntingtower by John Buchan [1922]

Ann Radcliffe La Motte, thinking it possible it might yet shelter some human being, advanced to the gate and lifted a massy knocker. The Romance of the Forest by Ann Radcliffe [1791]

The fiery Turnus flew before the rest: A piebald steed of Thracian strain he press’d; His helm of massy gold, and crimson was his crest. The Aeneid by translated by John Dryden

Benjamin Disraeli The picture, as we have mentioned, was hung in a broad and massy frame. Venetia by Benjamin Disraeli [1837]

Henry Handel Richardson These massy hedgerows cutting up the good pasture-land into chequerboard squares! — after the thready rail-and-post fences that offered no hindrance to the eye. The Way Home by Henry Handel Richardson

Benjamin Disraeli She looked up, she beheld, in a broad and massy frame, the full-length portrait of a man. Venetia by Benjamin Disraeli [1837]

Her massy hair was rolled in a great rough knob at the back of her head, ready to escape from the comb and slide down her back at the slightest provocation. The Cloven Foot by Mary Elizabeth Braddon [1879]