Phrases with "mony"

Robert Burns There’s Gaun,45 miska’t waur than a beast, Wha has mair honour in his breast Than mony scores as guid’s the priest Wha sae abus’t him. The Poetical Works of Robert Burns by Robert Burns

Walter Scott I hae never heard o’ ane that sleepit the night afore trial, but of mony a ane that sleepit as sound as a tap the night before their necks were straughted. The Heart of Mid-Lothian by Walter Scott [1818]

Sir Walter Scott I am thinking it wad concern my safety if she were to come back here, for there’s mony o’ the Elliots, and they band weel thegither for right or wrang. The Black Dwarf by Sir Walter Scott [1816]

Robert Burns O mony a knight, and mony a laird, This errand fain wad gae; But nae ane could their fancy please, O ne’er a ane but twae. The Poetical Works of Robert Burns by Robert Burns

Sir Walter Scott Ye’ll no deny that, Mrs. Rebecca? though I dare to say ye forgot to put your mistress in mind of what ye promised to say when I gied ye mony a half-crown. Guy Mannering by Sir Walter Scott [1815]

Walter Scott And he has paid the rescue shot, Baith wi’ goud, and white monie; And at the burial o’ Willie Scott, I wat was mony a weeping e’e. The Minstrelsy of the Scottish Border by Walter Scott [1802-1803]

There’s mony a true word spoke in jest, laddie,’ said Archie, gravely; ‘when we get to the Deil’s Lead we may find ain o’ that size. Madame Midas by Fergus Hume

Robert Burns Lord, mind Gawn Hamilton’s deserts, He drinks, and swears, and plays at carts, Yet has sae mony takin’ arts, Wi’ grit and sma’, Frae God’s ain priests the people’s hearts He steals awa. The Poetical Works of Robert Burns by Robert Burns

Sir Walter Scott But there’s mony yauld chields amang thae volunteers; and I mauna say muckle about them that’s no weel and no very able, because I am something that gate mysell — But we’se do our best. The Antiquary by Sir Walter Scott [1816]

Robert Burns And mony a ane that I could tell, Wha fain would openly rebel, Forbye turn-coats amang oursel, There’s Smith for ane, I doubt he’s but a grey-nick quill, An’ that ye’ll fin’. The Poetical Works of Robert Burns by Robert Burns

Sir Walter Scott So I thought to mysell, ye are ower mony for me to mell with; but let me catch ye in Barford’s Park, or at the fit of the Vennel, I could gar some of ye sing another sang. The Fortunes of Nigel by Sir Walter Scott [1822]

Sir Walter Scott Oh, weary on the wars! mony ‘s the comely face they destroy. Old Mortality by Sir Walter Scott [1816]

Walter Scott For he’s ta’en out a gay goud ring, Had cost him mony a poun’, “O grant me love for love, ladye, “And this shall be thy own. The Minstrelsy of the Scottish Border by Walter Scott [1802-1803]

Keep a watch on yoursel’ that day, sir, for there’s mony will wish ye out o’ the clachan. Witch Wood by John Buchan [1927]

Robert Louis Stevenson Ye’re young yet; ye’ve mony cantie years afore ye. The Weir of Hermiston by Robert Louis Stevenson

Sir Walter Scott But I reckon ye’ll be gaun to mak an antic o’t, as ye hae dune wi’ mony an orra thing besides. The Antiquary by Sir Walter Scott [1816]

Sir Walter Scott I hae garr’d him trow mony a queer tale mysell, gude forgie me. The Antiquary by Sir Walter Scott [1816]

Auld Dobbie in Murchison’s Close — he’s our doer [man of business], ye maun ken, as his father was afore him — he has had mony a sair tuilzie for our bits o’ rents. Witch Wood by John Buchan [1927]

Sir Walter Scott And for serving-men, there has mony a red-shank cam over the Tweed wi’ his master’s wallet on his shoulders, that now rustles it wi’ his six followers behind him. The Fortunes of Nigel by Sir Walter Scott [1822]

Sir Walter Scott And, Monkbarns, when ye laid his head in the grave (and mony thanks for the respect), ye, saw the mouls laid on an honest lad that likit you weel, though he made little phrase about it. The Antiquary by Sir Walter Scott [1816]

Sir Walter Scott I have drank mony a glass wi’ Glossin, man, that did you up, though he’s a justice now. Guy Mannering by Sir Walter Scott [1815]

Ye mind what he said o’ Prince Geordie: ‘Yet mony a ragged cowte’s been known   To mak a noble aiver; And ye may doucely fill a throne,   For a’ their clishmaclaver. The House with the Green Shutters by George Douglas Brown [1901]

Sir Walter Scott I hae seen mony a man wad hae felled another an anger him, that wadna muckle hae liked a clink against Crummies-horn yon time. The Antiquary by Sir Walter Scott [1816]

Walter Scott When she cam to the Harper’s door, There she gave mony a nicker and sneer —130 “Rise up,” quo’ the wife, “thou lazy lass; Let in thy master and his mare. The Minstrelsy of the Scottish Border by Walter Scott [1802-1803]

Sir Walter Scott But I’ll no need your callant, mony thanks to ye — I’ll send little Davie on your powny, and that will be just five-and-threepence to ilka ane o’ us, ye ken. The Antiquary by Sir Walter Scott [1816]

Sir Walter Scott But mony a man climbs up in Court by waur help. The Fortunes of Nigel by Sir Walter Scott [1822]

Arthur Conan Doyle There I lay tremblin’ in every limb, and sayin’ as mony prayers as I could mind, wi’ my e’e still peepin’ through the keek-hole, and’ fixed upon the door o’ the general’s room. The Mystery of Cloomber by Arthur Conan Doyle [1889]

Sir Walter Scott She kens mair about the Glenallan family than maist folk — the gudeman’s father was their fisher mony a day. The Antiquary by Sir Walter Scott [1816]

Walter Scott I’ve kend by mony a friend’s tale, Far better by this heart of mine, What time and change of fancy avail A true-love knot to untwine. The Bride of Lammermoor by Walter Scott [1819]

Walter Scott I hae had mony a day’s daffing wi’ Jean’s mither, and they say she bides on wi’ them. The Bride of Lammermoor by Walter Scott [1819]

Robert Burns To send a lad to London town, They met upon a day; And mony a knight, and mony a laird, This errand fain wad gae. The Poetical Works of Robert Burns by Robert Burns

Sir Walter Scott I’ve sate under it mony a bonnie summer afternoon, when it hung its gay garlands ower the poppling water. Guy Mannering by Sir Walter Scott [1815]

Robert Louis Stevenson See and dinna wreck yersel’ at the outset like sae mony ithers! Hae patience — they telled me aye that was the owercome o’ life — hae patience, there’s a braw day coming yet. The Weir of Hermiston by Robert Louis Stevenson

Sir Walter Scott It’s no mony months bypast; it was a lang courtship — few folk kend the reason by Jenny and mysell. Old Mortality by Sir Walter Scott [1816]

Walter Scott Shanet has had siller, and Shanet has wanted siller, mony a time since that. Chronicles of the Canongate by Walter Scott [1827]

Sir Walter Scott For if ever the dead came back amang the living, I’ll be seen in this glen mony a night after these crazed banes are in the mould. Guy Mannering by Sir Walter Scott [1815]

In prose be endited many oon; In metre eek, in mony a sondry wise; Lo, this declaryng ought y-nough suffise. Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales for the Modern Reader by prepared & edited by Arthur Burrell MA

Robert Louis Stevenson Ye’ll have heard tell of Prophet Peden. There was never the wale of him sinsyne, and it’s a question wi’ mony if there ever was his like afore. Catriona by Robert Louis Stevenson

Walter Scott If ony body kend o’ the chance she has o’ the estate, there’s mony a weel-doing man would think little of the bee in her bonnet. Saint Ronan’s Well by Walter Scott [1824]

Sir Walter Scott And mony ane my father saw when he used to come hame frae the fairs at e’en, wi’ a drap drink in his head, honest man. The Black Dwarf by Sir Walter Scott [1816]

Of deer thare wes then sic foison (profusion), That they wold near come to the town, Sae great default was near that stead, That mony were in hunger dead. The Book of Were-Wolves by S. Baring-Gould [1865]

Anthony Trollope There’s a mony things at Portray as ha’ to be lookit after. The Eustace Diamonds by Anthony Trollope

Sir Walter Scott But the road’s unco wild, and sae mony red-coats about, forby the whigs, that are no muckle better (the young lads o’ them) if they meet a fraim body their lane in the muirs. Old Mortality by Sir Walter Scott [1816]

Sir Walter Scott I’ll no live to see it, maybe; but there will be mony a blythe ee see it though mine be closed. Guy Mannering by Sir Walter Scott [1815]

Andrew Lang Scott too gives this, but ends with a verse not in Sharpe— And he has paid the rescue shot Baith wi’ goud and white money, And at the burial o’ Willie Scott I wat was mony a weeping ee. Sir Walter Scott and the Border Minstrelsy by Andrew Lang [1910]

Robert Burns Sweet fruit o’ mony a merry dint, My funny toil is now a’ tint, Sin’ thou came to the warl asklent, Which fools may scoff at; In my last plack thy part’s be in’t The better ha’f o’t. The Poetical Works of Robert Burns by Robert Burns

It’s mony a day since we cast een on ye here, Mr. David, and siccan days as they’ve been for me and mine. Witch Wood by John Buchan [1927]