Phrases with the verb "to pride"

Examples of verb "to pride" in the Pluperfect Tense

Pride (Pluperfect)

But they had prided themselves on the logical, if rather literal, fashion in which they had fulfilled certain vows about white elephants or flying pigs.

Though the Russian revolutionaries had prided themselves on their materialism, the Russian people retained a strong though unacknowledged tendency towards mysticism.

An appreciable number of them had prided themselves, even a shade ostentatiously, upon their domesticity.

He thought, perhaps, a little too much of popularity, and had prided himself a little perhaps, on managing “his boys”—as he called the tenants—with peculiar skill.

The right honourable gentleman had prided himself on his generosity as a Greek. He would remind the right honourable gentleman that presents from Greeks had ever been considered dangerous.

He who had prided himself on his skill in ferreting out other people’s secrets, was completely baffled by this youthful abnormal.

Examples of verb "to pride" in the Present Tense

Pride (Present)

A sensible man does not pride himself on acting according to the rules in force at the Châtelet and at the gaol.

Examples of verb "to pride" in the Imperfect Tense

Pride (Imperfect)

But, when he came to think things over, he did not pride himself on the self-control he had displayed.

It must be understood that Cicero did not pride himself on being a lawyer.

Other verbs and sentences related to "pride"

Verbs similar to pride

congratulate

I had never had so many friends and admirers in my life as came up to me then to congratulate me and testify to their admiration and goodwill.

plume

I believe there are not many sea-captains who would plume themselves on either result as a success.

glory

Every one knows my weakness; and did you feel half what you inspire, you would be proud, you would glory in what you now attempt to hide.

esteem

If you are unable to come, I shall give you fuller details, and would esteem it a great kindness if you would favour me with your opinions.

honor

GENTLEMEN, The invitation to address you this day, with which you have honored me, was a call so welcome, that I made haste to obey it.

parade

For several days the city had been in an uproar, crowds had paraded the streets, and had even clamoured at the palace gates.

shine

But it is hard to persuade a mother to part with her first babe; harder, perhaps, when the babe had been so fathered and so born than when the world has shone brightly on its earliest hours.

boast

She remembered Nick’s reluctance to use the motor-she remembered his look when she had boasted of her “managing.

credit

Of course, I could leave him here, but—if you will credit it—he seems really to wish to have me with him.

envy

Again, he bids Atticus not to be afraid but what he, Cicero, will be able to buy them some day — which if he can do he will be richer than Crassus, and will envy no one his mansions or his lawns.

reverence

Oh! many that the world load with their opprobrium are capable of acts — nay, have committed acts — which in others the world would reverence and adore.

pleasure

Not even from charity will pleasure come, if charity be taken up simply to appease remorse.